About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CNNW 5
CSPAN2 4
CSPAN 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just ha
. and prepared surveillance and precautionary measures. some civil rights groups are upset that the protests were viewed as criminal acts. the f-b-i says it recognizes the rights of groups to engage in peaceful protests, but must also deal with potential threat of violence. >> los angeles has moved up its annual gun buyback program in the wake of this month's shooting rampage in connecticut. people can drop off their guns in exchange for a grocery store gift card -- no questions asked. the mayor says the city's residents want to be proactive >> they want to act they're tired of waiting on congress and on legislators to do something. there is too much talk and not enough action this is an opportunity for people to act and get rid of guns they do not need. or do not use. all too often, the guns are stolen. >> the city destroys the guns it is given. since the buy back program started in 2009, los angeles has collected eight thousand weapons. can breathe. during superstorm sandy. it's the thought that counts, but sometimes that thought misses the mark. if you're hitting the mall or trekking to the p
will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkabl
, an did. this is for the marriage and sanctity of the family. gregg: did you read the iowa civil rights act? >> probably some time in 1991 when i was preparing for the new york bar. gregg: if you bothered to read the law you would have noticed that all you have to do is prove that gender is a factor, one factor, that's all. joey? >> arthur loves when i say this so i'm going to say it, this is outrageous. this is a blow to family values everywhere. when they couched the decision, that is the court in terms of family values. what about the values of this woman? what about equality, what about decency. what about respecting women and not treating them as objects. this decision goes too far. but consider the source, gregg, it was a decision mailed pwaoeupb seven males, which speaks to the need of having diversity on that court. when we look at the court's decision if it were not for our agenda mr. aidala she would have not been terminated. >> this was a woman running a law practice and one of her men was interfering with her marriage she could fire him as well. >> note hat gregg: the iowa c
and the work of the civil rights activist in the 1960s. and thomas mann and norm ornstein on their book of partisanship in congress. >> the tension builds in one of the things that happens during that time is that a soviet submarine is found by american ships. and there are charges on a soviet submarine. a knock out the electrical system. the carbon dioxide is rising. people are passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the commander. the commander loads the torpedo, the war started already in the war is starting. they want to launch the nuclear torpedo. fortunately, one of the other commanders on the ship from a lower rank talked him out of it. it might have saved the world. >> of this is so close to the edge. it really was one of the scariest moments after this. >> they said we didn't notice. honestly, we were teenagers. my god, we wouldn't even be here to talk. >> director oliver stone and peter koznick of the untold history of united states senator nunn on 10:00 p.m. eastern on booktv's "after words." part of four days of nonfiction authors and books through
on campus led to his initial ousting. >>> a rough end to the career of a maryland civil rights pioneer tp the director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office will retire january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. the decision comes amid some legal problems for snowden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drufrn driving case. >>> the man brutally beaten on christmas day believes he was the victim of a hate crime. according to a police report, 30-year-old kenny shaw had just left the liquor store at east hoffman and milton streets. he was only a block away when a group of five or six men surrounded him. additional blows followed. he also tells 11 news that he was taunted weeks ago and he thinks he was targeted this time. >> i feel like it was a hate crime because i am homosexual. like i said, i do stand out. >> police are now investigating this case and detectives say they have some good leads in what they are now calling an assault at this point. we're back in jus >> well,
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
is greater than the one who is in the world. and there's a wonderful spiritual that i was taught in the civil rights movement that sings friends don't treat me like they used to since i laid my burden down. and to lay down the burden of prejudice and narrow mindedness is a huge burden to lay down. and there will be a time when those friends you had as friends don't treat you like they used to. and just accessing what my friend leyla teaches me about god can consciousness. -- god consciousness. >> yeah. >> to access that. when this florida pastor wanted to burn the qurans, i said, i was in the gym on a bike, you know, doing my cardio, and i was reading this -- [laughter] and in "the new york times," and i said -- and it came to me we shouldn't be burning qurans, we should be reading qurans. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends to come and talk about what the quran means to me. and leyla came and spoke, and i asked her why she does what he does, and she said, oh, it's to keep my godnessness alive. and i think -- god consciousness alive which you know will never
senator alan simpson. after that congressman john lewis on the civil-rights activist work in the 1960s and later congressional scholar thomas mann and norman ornsetein in their partnership in congress. >> author edward klein joined booktv at freedom fest to talk about his new york times best selling book "the amateur". he looks critically at president obama before and after he reached the white house. here is what he had to say. >> the book currently on your screen has spent several weeks on the new york times best-seller list, many weeks at number one. "the amateur" has been written by edward klein who is our guest, booktv on c-span2. where did you get a title for this book? >> guest: it came from a meeting bill clinton had in chapel:00, new york, north of new york city where he has a home. this was back in august of 2011. his wife, his daughter and a bunch of friends to meet with him because he had news. he had done a secret poll in 2011 and polls showed if hillary clinton would challenge barack obama for the democratic presidential nomination in 2012, he thought she could win. she w
disputes. things like the civil rights fights of the 1960s. now it is routine. it requires really 60 votes to do anything in the senate. we have this intense level of party line voting with the filibuster. it's like a parliament system without majority rule. then you have the informal analog to that in the house which the majority party says, we're not going to bring anything up. it has to have 218 votes but it has to have a majority of the majority which gives a veto to the republican wing of the conservative party. that's where we'restick stuck right now. >> let's bring in lisa dejardan. is there in this particular case -- >> reporter: i'm hesitant to get into it because it gets into senate procedure. the simplest would be if the leaders agree not to invoke that 60-vote requirement. if they agree a majority would be enough. for that to work, the rest of the senate would then have to essentially allow it to. there would have to be no one that attempts a filibuster. that's the easiest way to get around the 60 votes. another way is to possibly use some sort of budget measure that could be p
. the also the civil war, unrest going on in syria. >> right. i see these various crises in the middle east and you named two of the most serious but adding what is happening in libya, in yemen and elsewhere, adding continuing threat of iran's nuclear weapons program, it support for terrorist groups like hamas and hezbollah, i could see all of these crises spinning together and the entire region growing out of control while the united states acts almost as if it is a bystander. this is unprecedented in recent decades to have such a weak, feckless in fact, u.s. role in the region. heather: do you see any change taking effect? >> well, i don't think so honestly. i don't think, for example the nomination of john kerry to be secretary of state or whomever the nominee for a new secretary of defense turns out to be, i don't see them changing the basic direction of obama's administration policy. i think this course we've been on in the past four years is directly attributable to the president himself. i think that will continue into his second term. in fact i would say, now that he is safely reele
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
this civil war will end. >> you know, this has been a war of attrition. you said, yes, that's right, it has been nearly two years. over 40,000 people killed, seems to get worse day after day. and all this happening at a time when in syria now you have the joint u.n. arab league envoy, lack barba lakhdar brahimi there. you have the rebels saying they're taking one of the key bases in the north of the country, on a highway that connects aleppo to damascus and yet still they cannot claim that they have won. it seems that the rebels are gaining momentum. we hear this more from the opposition activists, from the rebel free syrian army, but the government maintains they're ridding the territories across syria of the rebels, of the terrorists as they call them. and it just seems to be spiraling more and more out of control at a time when there is so much concern about what is going on in syria and so much pressure on the opposition and the syrian government to come to some sort of settlement of their disputes so the people of syria can live in peace once again. >> it is crushing news for hundreds
on russians who have carried out human rights violations. the state department released this statement in reaction to the law. "we deeply regret russia's passage of a law ending inter-country adoptions between the u.s. and russia and restricting russian civil society organizations that work with american partners. the russian government's politically-motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care. we regret that the russian government has taken this step and are further concerned about statements that adoptions already underway may be stopped." i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the
, for documents and testimony in a civil case to which i am not a party. after consultation with the office of general counsel, i will determine whether compliance with the subpoena is consistent with the privileges and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law schoo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15